AeroWindTunnel 6.0
Program Description

Airplane Flight Dynamics & Stability Analysis
for Gliding and Powered Flight



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Copyright 1999-2015 John Cipolla/AeroRocket

AeroWindTunnel is a Microsoft Windows, slider-input based computer program to determine if the criteria for longitudinal (pitch) or up and down and lateral (yaw) or side to side stability are satisfied for an airplane or glider in free flight. The necessary criteria for longitudinal static stability are that CM_0 the moment coefficient around the center of gravity at zero lift must be positive and CMcg_a the slope of the moment coefficient (CMcg) verses airplane angle of attack (a) curve must be negative. The aerodynamics routines within AeroWindTunnel estimate subsonic and supersonic parasite (zero-lift) drag coefficient by the component build-up method using a well-known flat-plate skin friction drag coefficient formula that is a function of Reynolds number and Mach number. Base drag and separation drag, known percentages or functions of skin friction drag according to Hoerner and others, leads to  an "equivalent skin friction drag coefficient" that is a function of skin friction and separation drag effects. Wave drag for supersonic flow is rapidly determined by an empirical Sears-Haack method that is a correlation of the actual Sears-Haack wave drag experienced by aircraft in supersonic flight. Using these methods zero-lift drag, drag due to lift, lift curve, lift slope, moment curve, and moment slope are quickly determined and have been validated from 0.3 Mach to 3.5 Mach using the AeroRocket wind tunnel and other sources. AeroWindTunnel is not a CAD program for determining weights and balance of aircraft and gliders but instead is a computer-based, conceptual-design wind tunnel program that uses slider-bar entry and imported fuselage shapes to quickly estimate stability of airplanes and gliders. Other features include display of elevator angle to trim given aircraft weight and velocity. Also, velocity and thrust required for level flight given aircraft weight are quickly determined.

AeroWindTunnel is AeroRocket's first true wind tunnel simulation program for determining model airplane and glider stability and whether or not a glider or model airplane is stable enough to fly. AeroWindTunnel is a true wind tunnel simulation program in that it determines whether an airplane is stable based on the position of the wing-body neutral point relative to the center of gravity and whether the relative contribution of the wings, fuselage and vertical fins to the forces and moments around the airplane center of gravity are sufficient for longitudinal and lateral stability. To perform a flight dynamics analysis AeroWindTunnel predicts CL, CD, CM and the derivatives of these coefficients relative to angle of attack as a function of the absolute and geometric angle of attack of the airplane or rocket in flight.

This introduction to AeroWindTunnel uses the HL-20 and X-30 Space Planes displayed below to illustrate the usefulness of AeroWindTunnel for determining the flight characteristics of realistic, real-world flight vehicles. In addition, an F-16 Type Jet Airplane has been included to briefly describe AeroWindTunnel's ability for the analysis of supersonic jet airplanes. Also, a new model airplane design called AeroEagle has been included to illustrate the usefulness of AeroWindTunnel for determining glider and model airplane aerodynamics.

NOTES: Please see the present collection of aircraft and space plane projects analyzed using AeroWindTunnel. Also,
AeroWindTunnel includes a bonus program called 2D-WING for the aerodynamic analysis of two-dimensional and finite aspect ratio airfoil sections. Finally, this web page is intended to describe AeroWindTunnel and is NOT an instruction manual. The complete instruction manual is included in the program installation and is accessed by first clicking File then Online-Instructions and finally DISPLAY.



HL-20, X-30 NASP and  Supersonic Jet Airplane designs used to illustrate AeroWindTunnel
Click models for more information
 

Basic Analysis Procedure
Please Use One of Two Methods

METHOD-1: S
LIDER-BAR
Define all aerodynamic surfaces like wing span and wing chord by selecting the Slider inputs option button. Then, by selecting either the TAIL/ELEVATOR or ELEVATOR option button the user can define an airplane composed of main wing and tail or a tail-less airplane. The input data required for slider-bar entry include number of vertical fins, wing dihedral angle, main wing setting angle,  zero-lift aoa (angle of attack), wing-body downwash angle, wing-body downwash gradient, wing-body moment coefficient, elevator effectiveness lift-slope, and tailless elevator moment. Further, by selecting the Import fuselage option button the user can replace the simple slider-bar symmetric fuselage with a more complex non-symmetric fuselage. If the imported fuselage option is selected, click the Fuselage-Aerodynamics command in the main menu. When the Fuselage Geometry screen appears click Input-Airframe-Data to import the fuselage geometry and then enter the other inputs on this screen to complete the fuselage analysis.

Defining the geometry of the airplane is performed by manipulating the slider-bars corresponding to MAIN WING, TAIL/ELEVATOR or ELEVATOR and VERTICAL FIN. Then, in the RESULTS AND LEVEL FLIGHT ANALYSIS data entry section the user defines the geometric angle of attack, elevator deflection (if required), airplane velocity and airplane weight. A complete analysis is performed each time data is modified and if the airplane will fly the statement, SUCCESSFUL ANALYSIS - AIRPLANE WILL FLY appears in the comment box. If an unsuccessful analysis occurs reasons for the failure appear in the FLIGHT RESULTS portion of the PLAN-VIEW AND SIDE-VIEW PLOTS data entry section. When those conditions are satisfied the airplane will fly.

Please note: For AeroWindTunnel wing span is the total distance from wing-tip to wing-tip including fuselage diameter separation between wing-roots. In addition, tail span is the distance from tail-tip to tail-tip where fuselage diameter separation is not included in span length. Finally, fin span is the total distance from fin-root to fin-tip where fuselage diameter separation is not included in span length.

METHOD-2: MANUAL ENTRY
Define all aerodynamic surfaces and flight coefficients for an airplane composed of wing and tail with elevator by selecting the Manual inputs option button in the
PLAN-VIEW AND SIDE-VIEW PLOTS data entry section. The input data required for manual input include main wing exposed surface area, main wing mean aerodynamic chord, horizontal tail exposed surface area, vertical fin exposed surface area, number of vertical fins, wing-body cg location from wing LE (Leading Edge), distance from airplane cg (center of gravity) to tail's ac (aerodynamic center), airframe fineness ratio (Lmax/Dmax), wing dihedral angle, main wing setting angle, tail dihedral angle, horizontal tail setting angle, wing-body ac from wing LE, zero-lift aoa, wing-body downwash angle, wing-body downwash gradient, wing-body moment coefficient, wing-body lift-slope coefficient, horizontal tail lift-slope coefficient, elevator effectiveness lift-slope, and tailless elevator moment. Then, in the RESULTS AND LEVEL FLIGHT ANALYSIS data entry section the user defines the geometric angle of attack, elevator deflection (if required), airplane velocity and airplane weight. A complete analysis is performed each time data is modified and if the airplane will fly the statement, SUCCESSFUL ANALYSIS - AIRPLANE WILL FLY appears in the comment box. If an unsuccessful analysis occurs reasons for the failure appear in the FLIGHT RESULTS portion of the PLAN-VIEW AND SIDE-VIEW PLOTS data entry section. When those conditions are satisfied the airplane will fly.


AeroWindTunnel Examples
HL-20 Spaceplane Simulation Back
Please click Fuselage-Aerodynamics for HL-20 fuselage definition and Plot-Coefficients to see coefficient plots and validation with HL-20 data.

Figure-2, AeroWindTunnel main screen used to define the basic  geometry of the HL-20 spacecraft.

In AeroWindTunnel simply click Input Airframe Data to import the x-y dimensions of the HL-20 plan-view and side-view fuselage shape.

Figure-3, AeroWindTunnel Fuselage geometry import screen. Simply define 20 plan-view and side-view station locations.

HL-20 at M = 0.30 and Elevator Deflection set to -30 degrees
Please click Plot-Experimental Data to see the screen containing HL-20 wind tunnel data to be compared with AeroWindTunnel plot results.

Figure-4a, AeroWindTunnel results compared with wind tunnel test data for the HL-20 at M = 0.3 and Elevator Deflection set to -30 degrees. Blue circle-lines represent AeroWindTunnel data for the HL-20 and the red circle-lines represent wind tunnel results.


HL-20 at M = 0.30 and Elevator Deflection re-set to 0.0 degrees

Figure-4b AeroWindTunnel results compared with wind tunnel results of the HL-20 at M = 0.3 and Elevator Deflection set to 0.0 degrees. Blue circle-lines represent AeroWindTunnel data for the HL-20 and the red circle-lines represent wind tunnel results.

 


X-30 Spaceplane Simulation and Wind Tunnel Measurements Back
Please click Fuselage-Aerodynamics for X-30 fuselage definition and Plot-Coefficients to see coefficient plots and validation with X-30 data.

Figure-5, AeroWindTunnel main screen used to define the basic  geometry of the X-30 spaceplane.

In AeroWindTunnel simply click Input Airframe Data to import the x-y dimensions of the X-30 plan-view and side-view fuselage shape.

Figure-6, AeroWindTunnel Fuselage geometry import screen. Simply define 20 plan-view and side-view station locations.


3-DIMENSIONAL ORTHOGRAPHIC DISPLAY OF AIRCRAFT MODEL GEOMETRY

Figure-7, Three-dimensional wireframe display of aircraft model geometry illustrating rotation, translation and magnification controls.

Please click Plot-Experimental Data to see the screen containing X-30 AeroRocket subsonic wind tunnel data compared with AeroWindTunnel plot results.

Figure-8, AeroWindTunnel results compared with X-30 subsonic wind tunnel test data. Blue circle-lines represent AeroWindTunnel aerodynamic data for the X-30 and the red circle-lines represent results from testing the X-30 in the AeroRocket subsonic wind tunnel. The X-30 is pictured in Figure-9 being tested in the AeroRocket wind tunnel to determine CD, CL, L/D and Cm.


Figure-9, X-30 NASP tested in the AeroRocket wind tunnel

to determine CD, CL, L/D and Cm aerodynamic coefficients.

The following series of tests were conducted in the AeroRocket subsonic wind tunnel to determine Pitch (nose-up/nose-down) and Yaw (side-to-side) center of pressure location for the X-30 NASP. The AeroRocket low friction caliper was used successfully to determine two-axis center of pressure location. Figure-10 illustrates measurement of the Pitch center of pressure and Figure-11 illustrates measurement of the Yaw center of pressure. The following table of X-30 NASP center of pressure location was generated using the AeroRocket subsonic wind tunnel with results tabulated verses AeroWindTunnel results for the X-30 NASP.
 

  Wind Tunnel Test
Xcp From Nose Tip
AeroWindTunnel
Xcp From Nose Tip
Difference

Pitch

0.59664 0.6001 -0.58%

Yaw

0.58824 0.8017 -26.6%


Figure-10, Pitch center of pressure wind tunnel test. Mounted less than 2 mm ahead of Xcp.


Figure-11, Yaw center of pressure wind tunnel test. Mounted less than 2 mm ahead of Xcp.

The following X-30 NASP drag coefficient (Cd) comparison was generated by several VisualCFD analyses and compared to AeroWindTunnel results for Cd verses Mach number. Twenty separate 2-D centerline VisualCFD analyses were performed at Mach 0.2, Mach 0.4, Mach 0.7, Mach 1, Mach 1.125, Mach 1.25, Mach 1.5, Mach 2, Mach 3, and Mach 5, angle of attack = 0.0 degrees at 150,000 feet. From comparison of Cd verses Mach number in Figure-12 it is evident the 2-D centerline assumption is most valid for supersonic flow, M>1. This comparison requires AeroCFD 3.5.1 or higher and AeroWindTunnel for analysis.

Cd vs. Mach number
Figure-12, AeroWindTunnel (blue) vs. 2D VisualCFD results (red)

 

Jet Airplane Simulation Back
AeroWindTunnel
is also useful for the analysis of supersonic jet airplanes as illustrated in Figure-13.

3-D Orthographic image of jet airplane model geometry

Figure-13: Jet airplane zero-lift drag coefficient (CD0) compared with data from Aircraft Design: A Conceptual Approach by D. P. Raymer. Blue line represents AeroWindTunnel results for CD0 and red dot-line represents data from Aircraft Design.

 

AeroWindTunnel is also great for determining flight characteristics of gliders and simple airplanes using the Manual Input mode of operation. This glider was analyzed and successfully flown after being analyzed using AeroWindTunnel.


Figure-14, AeroWindTunnel Manual Input mode used to define the geometry of a glider for flight analysis.


Figure-15, Glider in flight.

 

MODEL UAV DESIGNED USING AEROWINDTUNNEL Back
The AeroEagle model aircraft (UAV) is an electric motor propelled tailless airplane designed using AeroWindTunnel.

Specifications

Wing span, 46.67 cm
Fuselage length, 11.75 cm
Fuselage diameter, 4.75 cm X 3.0 cm
Weight (airframe, motor, capacitor and header pins), 27 grams




AeroEagle model UAV illustrated with electric motor, capacitor and battery pack. Project file and Fuselage Geometry file require AeroWindTunnel for stability analysis and design.
 Tethered powered flight                  3D Display
AeroEagle
in cg-mounted, tethered powered flight and AeroWindTunnel 3D Display

 

AeroCFD 2D-WING bonus feature addition to AeroWindTunnel Back

AeroWindTunnel includes a new program called 2D-WING for the aerodynamic analysis of two-dimensional (2-D) and finite aspect ratio (AR) airfoil sections. 2D-WING uses vortex lift panels to compute CD, CL and Cm,c/4 for airfoil sections using NACA four digit airfoils, streamlined, flat plate, double wedge (D'Wedge) and imported custom shapes for a wide range of 2-D and finite AR airfoils. Several NACA five-digit airfoils from Appendix III in the book Theory of Wing Sections allow the user to rapidly specify complex imported shapes. Other useful input variables include wing Reynolds number (Re) and angle of attack in degrees. Also, 2D-WING produces filled color contour plots and line color contour plots for pressure coefficient (Cp) and U/U0 where the number of contour levels can be specified from 3 to 256 levels. In addition, the following standard plots are produced, Cp verses chord length and U/U0 verses chord length for the upper and lower airfoil surfaces. Also, CL verses AOA, CD verses AOA, CD verses CL, CL/CD verses AOA and Cm verses AOA are quickly plotted. Finally, the total number of 2-D vortex panels that define the upper and lower surfaces of an airfoil can be specified as 100, 200 or 300.


Figure-16, A bonus feature of AeroWindTunnel is that AeroCFD 2D-WING is included at no extra cost to determine CD, CL and Cm for airfoils.

 

ACCESS TO ONLINE INSTRUCTIONS (VERSIONS PRIOR TO 6.4.0.4): The online instructions are accessed by clicking File then Online Instructions from the main screen menu. Internet access is required to see the instructions.

ShowHTML.exe
displays the online instructions and is accessed by clicking File then Online Instructions as explained above. For Windows XP ShowHTML.exe is located in c:/Program Files/AeroWindTunnel. However, for Windows 7 and Windows VISTA ShowHTML.exe is located in c:/Program Files (x86)/AeroWindTunnel.


AeroWindTunnel Sample Files
Glider_Examples.zip located in the AeroWindTunnel directory, provides sample project files, fuselage geometry files and experimental data files for results comparison. Please decompress the examples file using WinZip as usual and locate all files in the AeroWindTunnel directory. For Windows XP the AeroWindTunnel directory is
located in c:/Program Files. However, for Windows 7 and Windows VISTA the AeroWindTunnel directory is located in c:/Program Files (x86).

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SUMMARY OF FEATURES
1. Methods of data input and model definition
a) Aerodynamic components include fuselage, wings (standard and double-delta), horizontal tail, elevator and a user defined quantity of vertical fins.
b) Specify non-symmetric fuselage plan-view and side-view shapes using only 20 X-Y points arrayed in text (TXT) file format. AeroWindTunnel does not require DXF and IGES format geometry files for operation because AeroWindTunnel is not a CAD program.
Instead, AeroWindTunnel is a computer-based, conceptual-design wind tunnel program that uses slider-bar entry and imported fuselage shapes to quickly estimate stability of airplanes and gliders.
c) Results from 0.0 Mach to Mach 30 and angles of attack from -45 to +45 degrees
d) Manual entry of airplane flight coefficients from wind tunnel and CFD supplied data with complete display of values.
e) Slider-bar entry of airplane dimensions using the built-in ability to determine flight coefficients and flight derivatives with complete display of values.
f) Define atmospheric properties (pressure, density, viscosity etc) from Sea Level to 200,000 feet.
g) Velocity defined in meters/sec, feet/sec or Mach number.
h) For supersonic flow, wave drag includes propulsion inlet-area effects.
i) Geometry specifications include pointed nose, round nose, elliptical fuselage cross-section, rectangular fuselage cross-section, turbulent flow, laminar flow, and whether or not to include fuselage boat tail drag reduction.
j) Wave drag for wings having the following cross-sections may be specified: Single wedge (KLE=1), Symmetrical double wedge (KLE=4), Biconvex section (KLE=5.3), Streamline foil with x/c=50% (KLE=5.5), Round-nose foil with x/c=30% (KLE=6.0), Slender elliptical airfoil section (KLE=6.5) and finally Double wedge with maximum thickness at arbitrary x/c location (KLE=[c/x]/[1-x/c]).
k) Surface roughness effects for the following surfaces are used to determine the cut-off Reynolds number for each aerodynamic component: None (perfectly smooth), Camouflage paint on aluminum, smooth paint, production sheet metal, polished sheet metal, and finally smooth molded composites.
l) Aerodynamic effects include swept wing contribution to drag and lift.
m) Basic units of measurement may be specified as meters, centimeters, feet, or inches.
n) AeroWindTunnel instructions distributed in HTML format using WinZip compression.
o) Display WING or BODY drag divergence Mach number (MDD) depending on the effects of wing and body on wave drag.

2a. Input Flight coefficients and data
a) Flight altitude above sea level, Z
b) Main wing exposed surface area, Sref
c) Main wing mean aerodynamic chord, c
d) Horizontal tail exposed surface area, St
e) Vertical fin exposed surface area, Sf
f) Number of vertical fins, N_fins
g) Wing-body cg location from wing leading edge, h, c=ref
h) Distance from airplane cg to tail aerodynamic center, l_t
i) Airplane fineness ratio, L/D
j) Wing dihedral angle (+ up)
k) Main wing setting angle, -TE up, i_w
l) Tail dihedral angle (+ up)
m) Horizontal tail setting angle, +TE up, i_t
n) Airplane velocity, M/SEC, FT/SEC and Mach
o) Airplane mass, KG, LB
p) Geometric angle of attack, deg
q) Flight angle for unaccelerated flight, deg
r) Elevator deflection, +TE down, deg

2b. Input Flight coefficients and data
Wind Tunnel or CFD supplied data (All required if using Manual Input)
a) Wing-body aerodynamic center from wing LE, h_ac_wb, c=ref
b) Zero-lift angle of attack,
a @ L=0
c) Wing-body downwash angle,
e (a=0)
d) Wing-body down-wash gradient,
e_a
e) Wing-body moment coefficient, Cm
f) Wing-body lift-slope coefficient, CL
a
g) Horizontal tail lift-slope coefficient (if required), CL
a
h) Elevator effectiveness lift-slope, CL
de
i) Tailless elevator moment (if required), Cm
de

3. Output Flight coefficients and parameters
a) Slope of pitch-moment coefficient, Cm
a
b) Pitch-moment coefficient around cg at initial angle of attack, Cm
c) Slope of yaw-moment coefficient due to sideslip, Cn
b
d) Slope of rolling-moment coefficient due to sideslip, Cl
b
e) Absolute angle of attack for trimmed flight (Cm = 0),
aa
f) Moment coefficient around cg when lift (L) = 0, Cm, 0
g) Tail volume ratio, VH
h) Neutral point location for pitch measured from wing leading edge (LE) and normalized by main wing mean aerodynamic chord (c), hn.
i) Airplane static margin for pitch: SM = hn - h where h is the wing-body cg location from the wing LE.
j) Airplane neutral point location for yaw measured from the nose-tip and normalized by the vertical fin mean aerodynamic chord (cf), hn_fb.
k) Airplane static margin for yaw, SM = hn_fb - h where h is the wing-body cg location from the nose-tip.
l) Wing lift slope for pitch, CL
a_w
m) Body lift slope for pitch, CL
a_body
n) Horizontal tail lift slope for pitch, CL
a_tail
o) Vertical fin lift slope for yaw, CL
a_fin
p) Rate of change of lift coefficient with elevator deflection, CLd
q) Rate of change of moment coefficient with elevator deflection, Cm
d

4. Output requirements for climbing and level flight
a) Airplane drag coefficient, CD
b) Airplane lift coefficient, CL
c) Airplane lift to drag ratio, L/D
d) CL required for level flight
e) Thrust required for climbing and level flight
f) Angle of attack for level unaccelerated flight (deg)
g) Elevator angle at trim, +TE down (deg)
h) Climb Rate in meters/min or feet/min for Flight angle

5. File and data manipulation
a) Plot total airplane moment coefficient (Cmcg) around center of gravity verses angle of attack (
a).
b) Plot wing-body moment coefficient (Cmcg_wb) around center of gravity verses angle of attack (
a).
c) Save project files as .DAT files to disk.

d) Save results to disk as .DAT files.
e) Print screen images to the printer.

6. Real-time airplane plan view and side view with the following information
a) Center of gravity (Cg) location marked on plan/side view as a
green dot.
b) Wing-body aerodynamic center (ac_wb) location marked on plan view as a
red dot.
c) Total airplane aerodynamic center (ac_pitch) or neutral point marked on plan view as a black dot.
d) Tail aerodynamic center (ac_tail) location marked on plan view as a red dot.
e) Vertical-fin-body aerodynamic center (ac_yaw) location marked on side-view as a black dot.
f)  Vertical-fin aerodynamic center (ac_fin) location marked on side-view as a red dot.

7. Real-time airplane design values displayed on plan view and side view
a) Airplane center of gravity (cg).
b) Airplane pitch aerodynamic center or neutral point location (ac_pitch).
c) Wing-body aerodynamic center location (ac_wb).
d) Exposed-wing aspect ratio (AR_wing).
e) Tail aerodynamic center location (ac_tail).
f) Airplane yaw aerodynamic center or neutral point location (ac_yaw).
g) Fin aerodynamic center location (ac_fin).
h) Horizontal Tail aspect ratio (AR_tail).
i) Vertical Fin aspect ratio (AR_fin).

8. Results Plots
a) Plot nine coefficients verses angle of attack (-25 to 25 degrees).
b) Plot nine coefficients verses Mach number (0.0 to Mach 30).
c) Plot coefficients using exposed wing area, total wing area, body planform area or maximum body frontal area as plot reference.
d) Insert experimental data into coefficient plots for comparison.
e) Recent enhancements include the ability to display
3-D Orthographic images of aircraft model geometry.

9. Much more ...


AEROWINDTUNNEL REVISIONS
AeroWindTunnel 6.4.0.5 (2/10/12)

1) Increased maximum Mach number from Mach 4 to Mach 30 for all coefficient plots verses Mach number and angle of attack.
2) Improved airframe hypersonic flow (greater than Mach 5) drag (Cd) and lift (CL) correlation with experimental aerodynamic data.
a) Improved Cd verses Mach number comparison with text book aerodynamic data for the Fighter Airplane Project.
b) Improved Cd verses Mach number comparison with test results from the AeroRocket supersonic wind tunnel and VisualCFD results for the HTV-3X project.
c) Improved supersonic analysis prediction for airframe lift slope, CN
a and center of pressure location, Xcp for all supersonic Projects.
3) Fixed Slider-input "ON" and Import-Fuselage "OFF" error where Airplane velocity (V2) increases orders of magnitude larger than the saved value for V2 when opening a Project.
4) Added the ability to save a file with the STK extension for importing Cd verses Mach number information into the Satellite Trajectory Kit routine recently added to StarTravel.
5) Added the ability to compute exact Maximum Body Frontal Area (Smax) by specifying a Section-Factor area correction for the elliptical and rectangular cross-sections used by AeroWindTunnel.
6) In the RESULTS section on the Fuselage Geometry and Wing-Fuselage Aerodynamics Center Location screen, changed the text, Drag coefficient at aoa=0:CD_0 =, to Skin friction drag coefficient: CD_0 =, for added clarity.
7) In the RESULTS section on the same screen declared that center of gravity location (h_cg), vertical fin aerodynamic center location (h_ac_fin), pitch aerodynamic center location (h_ac_pitch), yaw aerodynamic center location (h_ac_yaw), horizontal tail aerodynamic center location (h_ac_tail), Wing-body aerodynamic center location (h_ac_wb), Wing-body aerodynamic center location (h_ac_wb) and Fuselage pitch/yaw aerodynamic center locations (h_ac_b) are normalized by airframe length. In addition, the tool-tip also declares that Skin friction drag (CD_0), Base drag (CD_base) and Wave drag (CD_wave) values are referenced to the exposed wing area.
8) Due to the extent of these modifications and error fixes users who purchased AeroWindTunnel starting with version 6.4.0.1 can receive a free upgrade to the newest version. In order to verify the validity of each request for a FREE version of AeroWindTunnel please provide name, the exact email used during original purchase and date of original purchase.

AeroWindTunnel 6.4.0.4 (3/07/10)

1) For AeroWindTunnel 6.4.0.4
the online instructions are accessed by clicking File then Online Instructions then selecting either When Using Windows XP or When Using Windows 7 or VISTA. Previously when operating under Windows 7 and VISTA the message, Error displaying Online Instructions was displayed when trying to access the online instructions. This occurred because under Windows XP, ShowHTML.exe is located in c:/Program Files/AeroWindTunnel but for Windows 7 and Windows VISTA the routine is located in c:/Program Files (x86)/AeroWindTunnel.

AeroWindTunnel 6.4.0.3 (2/07/10)

1) Previously, in the Coefficient Plots Verses Angle of Attack screen when the Save Coefficient Data As  command is selected from the File pull-down menu the values for Thrust Required (TR) and Velocity Required (VR) for level flight displayed in the Cd verses angle of attack listing were smaller than actual by 10^-6. Now, the actual value is the displayed value multiplied by 1000 as described in the heading for TR and VR.

2) Previously, in the Plots pull-down menu when the Coefficients vs. Mach number command is selected the listing did not display coefficients as a function of Mach number but incorrectly showed the variation as a function of angle of attack in degrees.

AeroWindTunnel 6.4.0.1/6.4.0.2 (4/22/09)

1) Added the ability to determine Thrust Required for Climbing Flight and level flight. In previous versions only thrust required for level flight was computed. In addition, made Flight angle an input variable where Climb Rate is displayed in feet/minute or meters/minute depending on initial units. Validated these modifications using the existing collection of airplane analyses in addition to a new analysis for the Me-163 rocket plane developed during World War II by Germany. AeroWindTunnel results for drag coefficient (CD) and climb speed compare exactly with results found in Fluid Dynamic Drag by S.F. Hoerner on pages 14-9 and 14-10 where in TABLE-A, CD = 0.012  and in Figure-7, Climb Rate = 11,600 feet per minute for the revolutionary rocket plane. Please request the new Me-163 analysis if you already own AeroWindTunnel.

2) Corrected a CGS and IPS units error. MKS and FPS units were not affected. This units error effected supersonic flight coefficients and thrust requirements.

AeroWindTunnel 6.3.0.0 (5/24/08)

1) Added double-delta wing geometry to the Fuselage Geometry and Wing-Fuselage Aerodynamic-Center screen. After the double delta wing is specified the user has the option of inserting a double-delta wing into the plots or inserting an equivalent double-delta wing into the analysis and plots. The double-delta wing and its variants are used to reduce the affect of the rearward aerodynamic-center shift that occurs in the transition between subsonic and supersonic flight.

AeroWindTunnel 6.2.0.2 (4/06/08)

1) Vertical fins could not be located at wing-tips and there was no fin vertical control. Now, fin-to-fin spacing and fin Y-location inputs can locate one vertical fin at each wing-tip location. This version adds a vertical fin Y-location input to accurately locate up to two fins in the vertical direction.
2) Wing span appeared to change for imported models with variable fuselage diameter as the wing location was modified using the LE location from nose tip slider-bar control. This was a geometry problem that did not alter AeroWindTunnel results.
3) Effects for some data inputs on the Fuselage Geometry screen were not seen immediately in the 3-D wire frame plots.
4) Added the HTV-3X or BlackSwift, XCOR's Lynx and AeroRocket's AeroEagle to AeroWindTunnel's collection of project files in Glider_Examples.zip. Already included in the AeroWindTunnel collection are project files for the X-30 NASP, HL-20 and F-16 type jet airplane in addition to several other gliders and examples from text books.

AeroWindTunnel 6.2.0.1 (12/17/07)
1) For the Plot Coefficients screen, Cd verses angle of attack and Cd verses Mach number are now displayed from 0.0 to a maximum value.
2) For the Plot Coefficients screen, plot error occurred for all coefficients verses Mach number if geometric angle of attack equaled zero-lift angle of attack.
3) Run-time error "6" overflow occurred for manual input if most values were made zero in the MANUAL ENTRY: WIND TUNNEL DATA section.
4) Input blocks for Horizontal tail exposed surface area and Vertical fin exposed surface area were sometimes zeroed when manual input was specified.

AeroWindTunnel NOTES
NOTE-1:  For versions prior to 6.4.0.4 AeroWindTunnel must be installed in the default directory (C:/Program Files/AeroWindTunnel/) for the online instructions to be accessed from within the program.

NOTE-2: Input data for all AeroRocket programs must use a period (.) and not a comma (,) and the computer must be set to the English (United States) language. For example, gas constant should be written as  Rgas = 355.4 (J / kg*K = m^2 / sec^2*K) and not Rgas = 355,4. The English (United States) language is set in the Control Panel by clicking Date, Time, Language and Regional Options then Regional and Language Options and finally by selecting English (United States). If periods are not used in all inputs and outputs the results will not be correct.

SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS
(1) Screen resolution: 1024 X 768
(2) System: Windows 98, 2000, XP, Vista, Windows 7, NT or Mac with emulation
(3) Processor Speed: Pentium 3 or 4
(4) Memory: 64 MB RAM
(5) English (United States) Language

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a, m, p, and w)

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